Apple begins to patch holes. Will their systems become secure again?

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For years, the Apple ecosystem has boasted the name of the safest. Due to the set of restrictions imposed, the chances of infecting devices or other undesirable adventures were much smaller than those of the competition. Competition, which gives much more scope to show off to all users – and then, as you know, adventure is not difficult. But in recent months we regularly hear about some gaps, oversights and mishaps on the part of Apple. I don’t know which of these categories is the most annoying myself, but one thing is certain – Apple is getting to work and apparently wants to restore its systems to their former glitter in terms of security.

Will Apple systems be secure again?


Why these changes in approach? It’s hard to say – maybe just the measuring cup has changed? Nevertheless, Apple’s security chief Ivan Krstić announced at this year’s Black Hat conference in Las Vegas an extension of the bug bounty program, under which everyone will soon be able to report errors and shortcomings – and, what’s more, they can also count on rewards.

But this is not the end – apart from spreading the wings of the program that already exists and is doing well, soon macOS will also join. What’s more: searching for bugs on Apple systems will finally become more profitable. So far, the maximum payment they could count on for the holes they found was 200,000 dollars. Now that amount would rise to even a million dollars from the gap found – not bad!

However, this is not all – specialists who will find some more serious errors before the software reaches a wider audience can count on a bonus in the form of an additional 50% of the amount that should be found for finding the error. In addition, Apple is finally reaching out to security professionals – and giving them slightly more access options than other users. This is to allow even easier and more effective search for gaps in their software – all this under the new iOS Security Research Program, which is expected to officially start next year.

It’s nice that Apple starts to notice the problem and finally gets to work – or rather, facilitates / enables it to others. Looking at how many mishaps we have been observing in recent years I am afraid that it may cost them dearly. But the truth is that Apple is better than users of their equipment.

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