Facial recognition is no longer liked by the Chinese

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Facial recognition raises increasing doubts and protests in China. Professor Guo Bing sued the wildlife park, which changed the way the ticket was verified using a fingerprint for a face recognition system. The date of the hearing has not been set yet, but in China there is more and more debate about the right to privacy.

Facial recognition in China has become a common practice. Systems using them are used at airports, train stations, in shops and even in … public toilets. However, not everyone likes it and the debate about the right to privacy is intensifying in Chinese society. The more that facial recognition systems are part of a social trust system that rewards (or punishes) for specific behaviors. The full power of the social trust system will be noticeable this year, as every citizen in the country is to be covered.

Face recognition
Toilet paper only after scanning the face. To receive another piece of paper, users must wait nine minutes and perform another face scan. Is this crazy?

Suit for changing the verification method

Guo Bing, a professor of law from Zhejiang Sci-tech University, in April 2019 purchased an annual ticket authorizing him to enter the Hangzhou Safari Park. Originally, the entrance to the park consisted of scanning fingerprints. In October 2019, however, the park changed the verification method and introduced facial recognition. Guo Bing refused to scan the face and demanded a refund (about $ 190). The park refused. Guo Bing filed a lawsuit in which he emphasizes that his scanned image may fall into the wrong hands. The date of the hearing has not been set yet.

Online entries for this issue on the popular Weibo platform have received over 100 million views, and many users are calling for a ban on collecting such data.

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The case has become public again because on December 30, 2019, the authorities issued a decree specifying what practices were involved with the collection and use of personal data through the mobile application are not allowed. However, China lacks specific rules on data collection and privacy protection. Work on them is still underway.

China is building a powerful, technologically advanced surveillance system with ubiquitous security cameras. According to IDC, in 2022, nearly 3 billion cameras will be operating in China. And the Chinese government supports companies that deal with recognizing systems and artificial intelligence.

A lawsuit filed by a law professor heated the atmosphere on social and official media. And while originally the Chinese were ready to give up some of their privacy for security, now the mood is slightly different, mainly due to the spreading face scan. The more that the organization China Consumers Association Already in November 2018, it published a report showing that over 90 percent of mobile applications are suspected of excessive collection of personal data, and 10 percent actually collect biometric data, despite the lack of such a need.

face recognition
Entering a plane also requires "showing your face". It is not said, however, that everyone will be admitted. Too many penalty points in the social trust system can prevent travel.

Another argument for limiting recognizability are reports on photo trading. In December last year, a package of 5000 photos appeared on the market (which is not an impressive number for Chinese conditions) from the e-commers website Zhuan Zhuan. The package cost just $ 1.4

Face recognition is a deal with the devil

Middle Eastern nationals have been asked what they think about facial recognition systems. Results of a survey of 6,152 people from October to November 2019. were published on December 6 by the Nandu Personal Data Protection Research Center. The survey shows that 79 percent. is afraid that their photos will get online, and 65 percent worries that their image will be used to prepare fake photos or videos (deepfake). Half of the respondents believe that the collected data, including face photos, can be used by fraudsters. Over 3,000 are worried about the lack of face information encryption and linking payment accounts with information from recognition systems. And one of the most important applications – 43.7 percent respondents believe that the use of facial recognition should be limited.

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In an article that sparked extensive discussion in China, Lao Dongyan, a professor of law at Tsinghua University in Beijing, called the widespread use of face recognition systems "an agreement with the devil": "Mindless promotion of face recognition technology will open Pandora's box." The price we pay will not only be our privacy, but also our security, which we are after all striving for. "

One of our readers recently recalled in Benjamin Franklin's significant words: A man who gives away freedom in exchange for security does not deserve any of the above. One can get the impression that the Chinese have probably understood recently that something is up. Only or not too late? | allthingsblogging.com

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